Month: May 2019

It’s Not Easy Being Green


The mass of greenery is actually carefully cultivated chaos. I favor pachysandra, elderberry, sweet pepper bush, something evergreen with stinky white flowers, ornamental cherry trees, hosta, and the cedar tree. I rip out ivy, green brier, honeysuckle, errant maple and oak, and bittersweet. Pachysandra is a soft evergreen ground cover, which thrives in this climate

The Cathedral


Three years ago, I planted a Redbud in an open area of the woodlands, under some oak and pine. I wait for its tiny pink blossoms and feel relieved when a few appear. They say Redbuds are slow to establish themselves. Cultivated by the Wampanoags for their edible flowers and leaves high in vitamin C,

Memorial Day Garden


Mid Spring, and the Garden is blooming. I love my weigela blossoms. My Gram had a weigela in her yard, and she would call me outside to see it bloom. I of course was resentful and sulky for this interruption. I made it clear to her that I could not possibly care about a shrub.

Making Black Gold


I want to build a compost area, yet I am flummoxed by the prospect. Why do I have such a block about building a compost heap? As with anything, once I actually build one or two, I will have the hang of it. I could build a fish pond in a morning with just one

LL Visits


May 22- the is the first entry in more than a week because LL has been in residence. Her parents traveled to Bermuda for a wedding, and while she stayed here, she was all I could think about. We took breakfast in The Garden most mornings, and then followed up with – There is too

The Return


This morning is gray, windy, and fifty. I wore a trench coat and wool hat on my walk, and took no garden photos. The only thing I saw growing with vigor was poison ivy, which appeared suddenly on a vine ripping through the Persephone Garden and rocketing up a tree. I first noticed it yesterday.

Birds


This morning I was approached by a bird. This happens. I was coming out of the woodland threshold, St Francis on my right, the Heptacodium on my left, when a round blue gray songbird with a come hither saunter began to bop near me. As I walked along, it fluttered about three feet ahead, darting

Dandelions Part Three


Lol. How I amuse myself. After I finished this morning’s post about dew and fish ponds, I wondered about dandelions. I had walked all over my yard this morning, and could not recall seeing any. How would I ever collect enough to make Hansie 147 if I had already picked my yard clean? I was

Morning Dew and Fish Pond


I would not be continuing to garden if I were not enjoying some success, and in the interest of full disclosure, I am not really sure to what that success is owed. I try a lot of things. Some continue. Some fade away. This soggy, red-sky morning I am mindful of two forces working for

Dandelions Part Two


Today is fifty and bright. As I stepped off the porch, I checked my black berries soaking up the morning sun. I am going to have to research what they need, maybe even fertilize them, because I want fresh blackberries for breakfast. I walked into the Persephone Garden with an eye for dandelions. I am